How to Identify Your Photo, Slide and Negative Formats -

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Slides / Transparencies


A photo slide is a specially mounted individual transparency intended for projection onto a screen using a slide projector. This allows the photograph to be viewed by a large audience at once. The most common form is the 35 mm slide, placed inside a cardboard or plastic shell for projection.

Early slide projectors used a sliding mechanism to manually pull the transparency out of the side of the machine, where it could be replaced by the next image, and it is from this that we get the name "slide". Modern slide projectors typically use a carousel that holds a large number of slides, and viewed by a mechanism that automatically pulls a single slide out of the carousel and places it in front of the lamp.
35mm film was introduced in the 1930's and came into prominence in the 1960's. Standard 35mm film, such as Kodachrome, Ektachrome and Ansochrome transparencies from the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's are commonly in 2" by 2" slides with paperboard mounts, usually stamped with Kodak identifying information. Other film manufacturers such as Fuji also may be identified on the slide mount.

"Half frame" cameras produced an image size that is half the size of the typical 24mm X 36mm frame for 35mm. A 36 exposure 35mm film would allow you to take 72 frames on one of these cameras. The finished transparency film size is 18mm x 24mm.

There are a variety of non-35mm slide transparency film formats known as 126, 127 and 110 slide films. These are also mounted in standard 2" by 2" slide mounts, allowing them to be projected with the same equipment as the standard 35mm slides. Rarely seen are 110 slides mounted in smaller 1" by 1" mounts.

Preview your slides

If you want to view and check your 2" x 2" mounted slides before you send them to us for scanning, you can hire a simple to use photo slide viewer from us. The hire charge for the slide viewer will be deducted from the final scanning charge.


35mm Slide
Slide mount: 2" x 2".
Transparency Film Size: 24mm x 36mm
This is a standard "slide".


35mm Half Frame Slide
Slide mount: 2" x 2".
Transparency Film Size: 18mm x 24mm.
This is half of a 35mm film.


126 Slide
Slide mount: 2" x 2".
Transparency Film Size: 28mm x 28mm.
Kodak produced this slide starting in 1963.


127 Slide
Slide mount: 2" x 2".
Transparency Film Size: 40mm x 40mm.
Kodak produced this slide from 1912 to 1995.


127 "Superslide"
Slide mount: 2" x 2".
Transparency Film Size: Almost 2" X 2"
Often seen in tourist-purchased
or "postcard" slides,
Very rarely in personal images.


110 Slide
Slide mount: 2" x 2".
Transparency Film Size: 13mm x 17mm.
110 film was produced starting in 1972.

110 Slide
Slide mount: 1" x 1".
Transparency Film Size: 13mm x 17mm.
These are relatively rare.


Negatives


Film for 35mm photographic cameras comes in long narrow strips of chemical-coated plastic. In larger cameras this piece of film may be as large as a full sheet of paper, or even larger, with a single image captured onto one piece. Each of these negative images may be referred to as a negative and the entire strip or set of images may be collectively referred to as negatives. These negative images are the master images, from which all other copies will be made. They must be treated with care and handled with caution.

35mm negative film is the most commonly used film format. The 35mm negative frame is 24mm x 36mm. As each image is captured by the camera onto the film strip, the film strip advances so that the next image is projected onto unexposed film. When the film is developed it is a long strip of small negative images. This strip is often cut into sections for easier handling.

There are a variety of film formats that were used primarily in the 1970's and 1980's in relatively inexpensive cameras. Kodak (and other companies) produced cameras using 110, 126 and disc film formats. 110 films are still in production, though very limited. 126 films went out of production (with the exception of one small European manufacturer) in 1999. Only a few places remain to process and print these films.

Preparation Notes -
We cannot scan selected images from a strip, all images on a strip are scanned and charged for. Please do not cut the strips into individual pictures. If you have both the negatives and prints, it is better to submit the negatives for scanning as they will deliver a higher quality result.


35mm Negative Film
Frame Size: 24mm x 36mm.


35mm Half Frame Negative Film
Frame Size: 24mm x 18mm.


110 Negative Film
Frame Size: 13mm x 17mm.


126 Negative Film
Frame Size: 28mm x 28mm.


APS Advantix Film Negatives


Advanced Photo System (APS) films were introduced in the 1990's, mainly in "point and shoot" cameras. Kodak calls this film "Advantix". Initially, slide (transparency) and B&W film was available, but was mostly discontinued soon after introduction; hence color negative film is by far the most common form for APS film. APS films are compact, cartridge-based, 24mm wide films allowing for three image formats, including a panoramic format. Though the film format offers a number of advantages over 35mm, it never caught on with professional or advanced amateur photographers, primarily because the small film area (roughly 50% of 35mm film) does not allow for large, detailed prints.
Every roll of APS film has a 6 digit identifying number stamped on the cartridge; generally, prints from the APS cartridge will include this number printed on the back, along with date and time information from the image (which is recorded on the film). The negatives for this film are returned in the original cartridge after processing/printing. Hence, most people never see the actual negatives.

The small size and curly nature of this film makes it particularly difficult to scan, but we have devised and perfected a system to allow us to do this.

Preparation notes -
We cannot scan selected images from a strip, all images on a strip are scanned and charged for. Please do not remove the film from the cartridge and do not cut the strips into individual pictures.


Disc Film

Disc film was introduced by Kodak in 1982. The film was in the form of a flat disc, and was fully housed within a plastic cartridge. Each disc held 15 exposures, the disc being rotated 24° between each image. The fifteen images were arranged around the outside of the disc. Disc film went out of production around 1999; it is now no longer available.

The very small size of this film makes it particularly difficult to scan, but we have devised and perfected a system to allow us to do this.

Preparation Notes -
We cannot scan selected images from a disc, all images on a disc are scanned and charged for. Please do not cut or remove individual pictures from the disc.


Photographic Prints

We can scan photo prints up to A4 in size. Photo prints are particularly susceptible to deterioration and damage by fading and tearing. We can scan and digitize colour and black & white photographs and picture postcards up to A4 size. If requested we can scan both sides of a photograph, so if you have a cherished photo with vital notes on the back, this will also be preserved.

Preparation Notes -
If you also have the negatives to your prints, it is better to submit these for scanning as they will deliver a higher quality result. We cannot scan prints that are in photo albums, please remove the photos from the albums before submitting them to us for scanning.

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Serving customers across the UK and locally including - Reading, Wokingham, Maidenhead, Slough, Henley on Thames,
High Wycombe, Bracknell, Windsor, Newbury, London in counties of Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Surrey.
 
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